DIRECT - VISION - STANDARD

DVS System

The Direct Vision Standard (DVS) is a one of its kind legislation. All goods vehicles above 12 tonnes, including cars from outside the UK, will need a licence to travel into Greater London from October 26, 2020, if their car does not meet the requisite Direct Vision Standard (DVS) star rating.
The Direct Vision Standard was created to lessen the risk of bicycles and pedestrians being hit by HGVs by eliminating blind spots. When riding next to the nearside (passenger side) of HGVs turning left, many cyclists are at risk of severe injury or worse. Because HGV drivers are up higher than drivers of smaller vehicles, they may be unable to spot a cyclist on their nearside and turn left or right without realising it.
The Direct Vision Standard is thought to improve the safety of British fleets and roadways in general. The Direct Vision Standard will lower the likelihood of close-proximity blind spot crashes by boosting driver visibility, providing drivers with the skills they need to navigate safely and preventing harm to vulnerable road users. As a result, many accidents would be avoided, and many drivers and road users will be spared the stress of tragic crashes.
The Direct Vision Standard determines how much a driver can see through their cab windows and mirrors and the size of the blind zones that arise. It assigns a star rating to HGVs ranging from zero (worst) to five (best) (highest). For example, a driver in a zero-star car will have poor direct vision and will be unable to see a pedestrian’s head and shoulders if they are fewer than 4.5 metres away from the cab side. A five-star vehicle’s driver will have an excellent direct vision and will be able to see pedestrians, cars, and cyclists who are immediately in front of their vehicle’s cab side.

The Direct Vision Standard 'Safe System' includes:

Left-Hand Drive Vehicles

The same equipment and ‘Safe System’ are required for left-hand drive vehicles and right-hand drive vehicles. On left-hand drive automobiles, mirrors, cameras, and sensors should be installed properly to eradicate the blind spot on the vehicle’s right-hand side.
Following a spate of crashes and fatalities involving Heavy Goods Vehicles in the Greater London area, Transport for London (TFL) implemented the DVS scheme. The scheme aims to increase safety for cyclists, pedestrians, and motorcyclists in the Greater London area. It went into effect on October 26, 2020, and will be operational 24 hours, 365 days a year.

What Kind of Safety Equipment Does A Zero-Starred Vehicle Require To Get A Permit?

A set of proximity sensors mounted on the vehicle’s nearside that informs the driver if a road issue is present on the vehicle’s nearside.
An auditory alarm that sounds when a vehicle is turning left, alerting other road users and pedestrians.
This camera is mounted on the near side of the vehicle and connects to the in-cab monitor, giving the driver complete vision of their vehicle’s blind spot.
When turning left, the driver has a complete vision of his car and, in particular, a full view of his blind spot camera.
Placed in a visible location to warn pedestrians and bikers of impending danger.
Class V and VI Mirrors provide a better view of blind zones.
This feature is installed on both sides of the truck to prevent road users from being pulled beneath the HGV.

How Long Will the Permit Last?

The HGV Safety Permit’s duration is determined by whether the vehicle passes the minimum DVS criteria or if it was issued under the Safe System:
In 2022, the progressing Safe System: Requirements will be evaluated to include any new technology or safety equipment that is not currently ready. Before re-application, these will need to be installed on all 0-1, and 2-star rated vehicles if they are deemed relevant.

Get your Direct Vision Standard Safety Equipment

Ready-made solutions, ready to go:

DVS Equipment for Leading Fleets

DVS uses a star system to rate HGVs over 12 tonnes from 0 (lowest) to 5 (highest), based on how much a driver can see directly through their cab windows. HGVs over 12 tonnes entering or operating in Greater London will require a Safety Permit. The Permit scheme will operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and will be enforced on all roads within the Greater London Boundary from 26 October 2020.

Ready-made solutions, ready to go:

DVS systems

DVS Systems

Rigid Vehicles
Features Included
  • 7" AHD Monitor 3CH
  • AHD Rear Heavy Duty Camera with IR
  • AHD Side Camera
  • Left Turn Audio Alarm
  • Side Alert
  • Extension for Rear
  • Extension for Side Alert
  • Extension for Side

DVS Systems

Articulated Vehicles
Features Included
  • 7" AHD Monitor 3CH
  • AHD Rear Heavy Duty Camera with IR
  • AHD Side Camera
  • Left Turn Audio Alarm
  • Side Alert
  • Extension for Rear
  • Extension for Side Alert
  • Extension for Side
  • SUZI

Non-DVS systems

Non-DVS Systems

Rigid Vehicles
Features Included
  • 7" AHD Monitor 3CH
  • AHD Rear Heavy Duty Camera with IR
  • AHD Side Camera
  • Extension for Rear
  • Extension for Side

Non-DVS Systems

Articulated Vehicles
Features Included
  • 7" AHD Monitor 3CH
  • AHD Rear Heavy Duty Camera with IR
  • AHD Side Camera
  • Extension for Rear
  • Extension for Side
  • SUZI
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